©2019 by Japanese American Confinement Sites Consortium. This project was funded, in part, by a grant from the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Department of the Interior.

Who We Are:

The Japanese American Confinement Sites Consortium (JACSC) is comprised of organizations committed to collectively preserving, protecting, and interpreting the history of the World War II experiences of Japanese Americans and elevating the related social justice lessons that inform current issues today. Members include the ten War Relocation Authority confinement sites, as well as historical organizations, endowments, museums, commissions, and educational institutes.

Japanese American
Citizens League

Japanese American

National Museum

JAMPilgrimages

Japanese American
Service Committee

Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai'i

Kizuna

Manzanar Committee

Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee

INITIATIVES

CAPACITY BUILDING

Work together to build capacity for all member organizations.

DEFEND AGAINST THREATS

Defend against threats to historic sites, structures, artifacts, and stakeholder organizations, as well as threats to social justice.

ADVOCACY

Among other issues, advocate for the continuation of the
Japanese American Confinement Sites grant program, and other programs that help preserve and interpret this important chapter in our nation's history.

Contact: Brian Liesinger at brian@jacsc.org

or by phone at 605-359-3008

Fill out the form below to join the JACSC mailing list.

"Democracy does not necessarily result from majority rule, but rather from the forged compromise of the majority with the minority.

 

The philosophy of the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights is not simply to grant the majority the power to rule, but is also to set out limitation after limitation upon that power. Freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion; what are these but the recognition that at times when the majority of men would willingly destroy him, a dissenting man may have no friend but the law."

 

—U.S. SENATOR DANIEL K. INOUYE

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